Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water. – Christopher Morley

Christopher Morley

“Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water.” – Christopher Morley

About Christopher Morley

Christopher Morley (5 May 1890 – 28 March 1957) was an American journalist, novelist, essayist and poet. He also produced stage productions for a few years and gave college lectures.
Morley was born in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania.
In 1906 Christopher entered Haverford College, graduating in 1910 as [valedictorian]. He then went to New College, Oxford, for three years on a Rhodes scholarship, studying modern history.
Morley began writing while still in college. He edited The Haverfordian and contributed articles to that college publication. He provided scripts for and acted in the college’s drama program. He played on the cricket and soccer teams.
In Oxford a volume of his poems, The Eighth Sin (1912), was published. After graduating from Oxford, Morley began his literary career at Doubleday, working as publicist and publisher’s reader. In 1917 he got his start as an editor for Ladies’ Home Journal (1917–1918), then as a newspaper reporter and newspaper columnist in Philadelphia for the Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger.
Morley’s first novel, Parnassus on Wheels, appeared in 1917. The protagonist, traveling bookseller Roger Mifflin, appeared again in his second novel, The Haunted Bookshop in 1919.
In 1920 Morley returned to New York City to write a column (The Bowling Green) for the New York Evening Post.
Author of more than 100 novels, books of essays, and volumes of poetry, Morley is probably best known for his 1939 novel Kitty Foyle, which was made into an Academy Award-winning movie. Another well-known work is Thunder on the Left (1925).
In 1951 Morley suffered a series of strokes, which greatly reduced his voluminous literary output. He died on 28 March 1957, and was buried in the Roslyn Cemetery in Nassau County, New York. After his death, two New York newspapers published his last message to his friends:
“Read, every day, something no one else is reading. Think, every day, something no one else is thinking. Do, every day, something no one else would be silly enough to do. It is bad for the mind to continually be part of unanimity.”

(Source – Wikipedia)

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Heavy hearts, like heavy clouds in the sky, are best relieved by the letting of a little water. – Christopher Morley

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